Remy Porter

Remy is a veteran developer who provides software for architectural installations with IonTank.

He's often on stage, doing improv comedy, but insists that he isn't doing comedy- it's deadly serious. You're laughing at him, not with him. That, by the way, is usually true- you're laughing at him, not with him.

Configuration Errors

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Automation and tooling, especially around continuous integration and continuous deployment is standard on applications, large and small.

Paramdeep Singh Jubbal works on a larger one, with a larger team, and all the management overhead such a team brings. It needs to interact with a REST API, and as you might expect, the URL for that API is different in production and test environments. This is all handled by the CI pipeline, so long as you remember to properly configure which URLs map to which environments.


Get My Switch

by in CodeSOD on

You know how it is. The team is swamped, so you’ve pulled on some junior devs, given them the bare minimum of mentorship, and then turned them loose. Oh, sure, there are code reviews, but it’s like, you just glance at it, because you’re already so far behind on your own development tasks and you’re sure it’s fine.

And then months later, if you’re like Richard, the requirements have changed, and now you’ve got to revisit the junior’s TypeScript code to make some changes.


//article title here

by in CodeSOD on

Menno was reading through some PHP code and was happy to see that it was thoroughly commented:

function degToRad ($value) { return $value * (pi()/180); // convert excel timestamp to php date }

A Nice Save

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Since HTTP is fundamentally stateless, developers have found a million ways to hack state into web applications. One of my "favorites" was the ASP.NET ViewState approach.

The ViewState is essentially a dictionary, where you can store any arbitrary state values you might want to track between requests. When the server outputs HTML to send to the browser, the contents of ViewState are serialized, hashed, and base-64 encoded and dumped into an <input type="hidden"> element. When the next request comes in, the server unpacks the hidden field and deserializes the dictionary. You can store most objects in it, if you'd like. The goal of this, and all the other WebForm state stuff was to make handling web forms more like handling forms in traditional Windows applications.


Put a Dent in Your Logfiles

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Valencia made a few contributions to a large C++ project run by Harvey. Specifically, there were some pass-by-value uses of a large data structure, and changing those to pass-by-reference fixed a number of performance problems, especially on certain compilers.

“It’s a simple typo,” Valencia thought. “Anyone could have done that.” But they kept digging…


Sleep on It

by in CodeSOD on

If you're fetching data from a remote source, "retry until a timeout is hit" is a pretty standard pattern. And with that in mind, this C++ code from Auburus doesn't look like much of a WTF.

bool receiveData(uint8_t** data, std::chrono::milliseconds timeToWait) { start = now(); while ((now() - start) < timeToWait) { if (/* successfully receive data */) { return true; } std::this_thread::sleep_for(100ms); } return false; }

Learning the Hard Way

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If you want millions in VC funding, mumble the words “machine learning” and “disruption” and they’ll blunder out of the woods to just throw money at your startup.

At its core, ML is really about brute-forcing a statistical model. And today’s code from Norine could have possibly been avoided by applying a little more brute force to the programmer responsible.


Unknown Purpose

by in CodeSOD on

Networks are complex beasts, and as they grow, they get more complicated. Diagnosing and understanding problems on networks rapidly gets hard. “Fortunately” for the world, IniTech ships one of those tools.

Leonore works on IniTech’s protocol analyzer. As you might imagine, a protocol analyzer gathers a lot of data. In the case of IniTech’s product, the lowest level of data acquisition is frequently sampled voltage measurements over time. And it’s a lot of samples- depending on the protocol in question, it might need samples on the order of nanoseconds.


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